Revisiting the Child Care Decision

Revisiting the Child Care Decision

You made the right child care decision, your child thrived in the infant or toddler or preschool class, your family has become part of a community of working parents. And then something happens. Your child transitions to another early education class, a favorite teacher leaves, or some other disruption causes you to revisit your child care decision. Have you found yourself in this situation? I recently have.

It’s perfectly natural for parents to reevaluate their daycare or preschool decision especially as children’s needs change or there is a disruption at the school. But it’s not easy when it happens. We found ourselves in this sticky situation recently. There has been a higher than normal amount of teacher turnover in Owen’s toddler class this year. We’ve been patient and the center has worked with us to make the transitions as smooth as possible. Still, we have a toddler. He thrives on consistency and the close bonds he forms with caregivers. When we learned another teacher was set to leave, we had to seriously rethink our decision.

This was painfully hard for me. The mere thought of “maybe” moving him to a new center was a struggle. I love our child care center. Olivia (age 7) graduated from the program with very minimal teacher turnover. They hire wonderful teachers who can bring the curriculum to life and understand the emotional world of toddlers and preschoolers. When I think about the whole program, I am confident he is going to have a well-rounded experience that will more than prepare him for kindergarten and school beyond. In fact, they recently hired an awesome preschool teacher who Owen is set to have in the next six or so months.

Is that enough incentive to wait it out? To manage the inevitable behavioral consequences of another teacher transition? What if the new teacher leaves? What if we decide to enroll him in another child care center and it’s not the right fit? These questions linger. There is no perfect answer until time allows us the opportunity to look back and reflect on our decision. For now, we’ve ultimately decided to wait out the transition. We’re okay with our choice, comforted by the fact that, unlike many other parents, we have options. And we’re happy with the care and learning experiences he’s getting in-between the disruptions.

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One comment

  1. Belle Arwood February 3, 2014 at 11:22 pm

    Choosing the right day care which would make your child feel comfortable is a tough task. Your child’s safety would be your biggest concern and any small discomfort for your child would make you feel like hell! I have gone through this!

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